Sunday, 29 January 2017

Sunday Stitch School - Lesson 10: Japanese Darning Stitch

Darning socks, clothes and other textile items was seen as a necessary skill in the past, and samplers were made to show how.
The Japanese stitching crafts of sashiko and kogin were used to reinforce clothing, joining layers together and at the same time embellish what needed to be mended or strengthened. Intricate patterns were created and handed down.
However, the embroidery stitch known as Japanese Darning is a combination of the Running Stitch and the Holbein Stitch and does not feature in the Sashiko or Kogin style.
Or am I wrong? Carorose, Queen of Kogin, is there a connection? Do you know the history of Japanese Darning?

Mattia supplied the French name: Point de trait japonais ou point de reprise japonais, but I have traced no name in Swedish, nor in JAPANESE!!!!!

I found the Japanese Darning Stitch in several of my books, the best illustrations were in The Embroidery Stitch Bible.


This is what Japanese Darning Stitch looks like on my Aida sampler.


Working order:
 First a row of Running Stitches, longer on the top of the fabric than below and over an odd number of holes.


Then add a second (and third and so on)  row where the stitches are placed in a brickwork fashion.

Stitch slanted Straight Stitches to join the rows.
 For clarity I have used a different colour.

 Continue in the second row.

By using two rows you get a zig-zaggy border.
By adding row upon row you can fill a larger area, and

that is the HOMEWORK:
Fill a block on this sampler with Japanese Darning.

Happy Stitch Sunday to all!

24 comments:

margaret said...

not come accross this stitch before Qiueenie, it is so good you are sharing all these with us

Anonymous said...

Bonjour, bonne idée, encore un point que je n'ai jamais utilisé,
le nom français est :
- Point de trait japonais ou point de reprise japonais
Mattia

Annet said...

This is such a pretty pattern. It's been a long time since I did some pattern darning.

crazyQstitcher said...

I've seen the design before but not noted the name. It looks simple and quick to stitch. I see how it would strengthen worn areas of cloth.
I'll try it today. I'm enjoying all your stitch lessons.

Queeniepatch said...

Easy and quick and if you play with colour you can create a lot of different pattern within the pattern!

Queeniepatch said...

Thank you for giving me the French names.

Queeniepatch said...

This could inspire thread play. Each row of Straight stitches in different colour or thickness, and the same with each set of Holbein stitches...

Queeniepatch said...

Simple and quick but with the potential to vary the look with different shades and types of thread, and of course the spacing. The mended aren becomes an embellished one!

carorose said...

Hi Queenie,
Pettern darning goes back a long way. It was used in Ancient Egypt, the indigenous peoples across the north, around the Artic Circle use it. You will find it used by people in Asia to South America. But, I have never seen this stitch used in any Kogin piece, ancient or modern. So I had a look at the Korean version but couldn't find it their either. Where it comes from would be conjecture on my part but I would guess that it came out of the contact between France and Japan sometime in the 1800's. We may never know for sure. It is still a great stitch.

Queeniepatch said...

Thank you for your information. Yes, I was certain I had never seen it in Kogin. So far my Japanese books have given no hint to the origin of the name.

Janie said...

I agree, 'great stitch' it would make a fun free form stitch in different sizes.

Queeniepatch said...

I think it would look striking as a quilting stitch on one of your colorful quilts, Janie!

Renee said...

It is a lovely stitch!

Chitra Gangadharan said...

First time to see or hear this stitch. very interesting to read the information too. learning new things in embroidery on this challenge. I worked a few samples.
Thank you,
Chitra

Anneliese said...

A very interesting stitch. And I tell you I am a fan of darning.I like to do it. But of course this stitch is an artful way to mend things.

Queeniepatch said...

This is really 'fancy darning'.

Queeniepatch said...

Oh, good to hear there is something you didn't know about embroidery!!!
Thank you for always taking up the challenge and making variations on any stitch. I learn so much from you,

Queeniepatch said...

Actually I don't do a lot of darning, but with this stitch it would be more like embroidery than repairing a whole or strengthening a worn ut area.
Long live darning!

Pamela said...

What a great stitch! And you make it look so easy.

I am so behind in my blog reading, but I want to catch up and to try your Sunday stitches soon!

Julie Fukuda said...

I regularly darn socks but my darning looks nothing like that.

Queeniepatch said...

This makes a nice pattern and it is easy to stitch.

Queeniepatch said...

I think this darning stitch is ment to be decorative and should be done in a different colour than the sock/trousers knee itself. Some people who darn by machine use the zig-zag stitch and maybe this is the handmade version!

Susan Hook said...

This is a nice looking stitch, I can see the similarities with the machine zig zag stitch as you mentioned

Queeniepatch said...

I am glad you like it. On knitting it would be perfect as the slanted stitches would 'give' a bit and stretch along with the knit.
Yesterday I was asked to darn a torn knee on a pair of jeans. Do you think I used the Japanese Darning? NO! I settled down at the machine and did the usual straight stitch back and forth until the hole was invisible. THEN I remember the Japanese Darning Stitch. Mind you, the old gentleman whose jeans they were, would not have liked anything fancy!