Sunday, 26 August 2018

Sunday Stitch School - Lesson 72: Sham Hem Stitch

The Sham Hem Stitch that I found in Mary Thomas's Dictionary of Embroidery Stitches, is the stitch of the week.

Updated: 
French names: Point Yougoslave
or it could be called Point Zigzag Entrelacé,
says Mattia.

You work it in two one-way journeys, and preferably in two different threads.

Make the first stitch shaped like a V.


Make another V, and you have a W.

Continue till you have as many Vs or Ws as you like.

Now change to another thread for contrast, or use the same to get a blended look.
Come out of the fabric slightly below the top right arm of the first V.

From now on you will be working only under the threads so a blunt needle is preferable.
Working from right to left, take the needle under the bottom of the first V.

Go back one step and take the needle under the first three arms.

Go back one step and take the needle under three arms again.

Continue in the same way.
You can see how the loops wind around each point.

Anchor the thread at the top left arm of the last V.

Play with different weights and types of thread, and you will change the look. 

Homework:


17 comments:

  1. This looks like a good seam covering stitch.

    ReplyDelete
  2. It can be regarded as one of the interlaced stitches, and once you get the trick of interlacing stitches, all sorts of possibilities open up. Ive not used this one yet, but it's On The List...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I especially like the simplicity of the base V stitch.

      Delete
  3. I think I would need a ruler to get all thoseVs lined up neatly.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So would I if I wanted a neat line.
      Another trick is of course to use Aida or any other type of fabric with a clear grid or holes that will guide you.

      Delete
    2. It is strange, but I like all things uneven - wonky - for me it woulldn‘t matter if the stitches weren‘t lined up - however it depends on what kind of work I would use them.

      Delete
    3. Wonky or perfect, there are several ways of doing embroidery, neither is right nor wrong, just different.
      IF perfect is what you want, then even weave (or Aida) will be of great help to guide you.
      One thing is for sure, this stitch does not take curves well, so stitch to straight lines.

      Delete
  4. I think I have used this stitch but I couldn't remember what it was called.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There are a number of interlaced stitches out there, and a creative mind like yours' Linda, could make new combinations!

      Delete
  5. My needle and threads are ready. I thought of another similar looking stitch, Spanish Knotted.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Do you mean the Spanish Knotted Feather Stitch?
      I think it is Avery simplified version of Fancy Herringbone, one of the TAST stitches.

      Delete
  6. I like the interlaced look and the different threads really bring that out.

    ReplyDelete
  7. j'ai trouvé ce point dans le M.T. en français sous le nom de :
    - point yougoslave
    Sinon on aurait pu l'appeler "point zigzag entrelacé" ?
    Voilà
    Mattia

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Mattia for this:
      I found this point in the M.T. in French under the name of:
      - Yugoslav point
      Otherwise we could have called it "intertwined zigzag stitch"?

      Delete
  8. The new stitch looks very complicated!

    ReplyDelete

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