Sunday, 17 December 2017

Sunday Stitch School Lesson 47: Two-sided Insertion Stitch

Welcome to the last Sunday Stitch School lesson of the year. There is homework on Friday, but after that we'll take a break of two weeks over the winter holiday.

What stitch would be better to celebrate December with than one that is shaped like a star?

Stitch #47 is called Two-sided Insertion Stitch and was found in Reader's Digest's Complete Book of Embroidery. Why it is not called Star Stitch I do not know!
In Dutch it is called: Tweezijdige Steek. Thank you, Annet.
In French: entre-deux à double face (Thérèse de Dillmont)
- point d'entre-deux réversible (Mary Thomas) Thank you, Mattia
To work it you need some dots to lead your way:

 
On paper the design looks like this. If you are working on plain cloth, mark the pattern with a pen.


Making a template like this by piercing holes in a sheet of plastic is a good idea if you want to make a long line of even stitches. You can then easily poke the tip of a pencil through the holes and mark the pattern on any fabric.

Or work it on Aida or even weave, then you can count and find the right holes without problems, see my Aida sampler:

The reason it is called Two-sided Insertion Stitch is that it makes a very neat pattern on the back.


Stitch it in this order:



















A›B›C›D›C›E›B›F›D›E›D›G  (placed on the same level as D but to the right) ›F, and so on....
Follow these pictures:












A›B›C›D›C›E›B›F›D›E›D›G›F, and so on....


If you need a rhythm, look how the needle is facing: Towards you, away, away, away, towards you and then start over with Towards you.... Confusing?

On my SSS Reference chart:


Homework:
These Corded Coral stitches would like a sprinkling of stars, and maybe a band of stars, too.

















17 comments:

  1. It looks great on both sides!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Perfect for a table cloth, don't you think?

      Delete
  2. It's a lovely stitch, and very useful to have something that looks good on the back as well!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is a festive stitch and I hope it will add a new dimension to the lines of the Corded Coral stitches.

      Delete
  3. Oooh! I love this one! Beautiful work and thank you for the introduction to this pretty stitch.

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    Replies
    1. Yes, wouldn't this look good on a cq seam, e.g. on a loved son's Christmas stocking?!!!!

      Delete
  4. Great lesson. I will have to bookmark this one.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Please do! It's one of those addictive stitches, once you have learnt the complicated steps.

      Delete
  5. A wonderful stitch, Queenie. I've already printed the instructions and will be stitching shortly. You made the various threads very festive with the Corded Coral stitch.

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    Replies
    1. I have used this stitch before and knew I wanted to add it to the SSS collection, and now was the perfect time.

      Delete
  6. The perfect stitch for the season! Luckily I have the same book in a Dutch translation, so I can tell you the Dutch name: tweezijdige steek.

    ReplyDelete
  7. That's a unique stitch for sure.
    Beautiful stars on one side and lattice on the other.
    That's a good idea to use it with the Corded Coral Stitch, I think
    you'll get some wow results.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This pattern is nice as a single star or a row of them.

      Delete
  8. Lovely stitch. I thought I'd done this one but I can't find the proof - that's where a reference chart comes in handy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ref charts as evidence that you have worked a stitch - I've never looked at them in that way, but you are right!
      It is an addictive stitch - once you have learned the rather complex movement and it is 'in your fingers'.

      Delete
  9. Le nom français de ce point est :
    - entre-deux à double face (Thérèse de Dillmont)
    - point d'entre-deux réversible (Mary Thomas)
    Je vous souhaite de bonnes fêtes de fin d'année
    Mattia

    ReplyDelete

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