Saturday, 25 January 2014

13th Tokyo International Great Quilt Festival 2014 - Part 2

I spent another wonderful day at the show, meeting up with more amazing people, and was overwhelmed with it all = no energy to blog the same day.

Before reporting on that, let's return to the events of Day 1.

 As I mentioned before the show is held at Tokyo Dome, an indoor baseball arena.
Although the queue is long and you might have to wait twenty or thirty minutes to get in, everything goes on in an orderly manner. There are people to lead you right, security guards, a bag search and then you enter through a turnpike, one by one.

Partnership quilts
You can read the details for taking part in this charity quilt project here.
This time NHK had received 10519 blocks, and under the leadership of Kathy Nakajima, 82 bed size quilts of 130 blocks each were pieced, quilted and then displayed at the show by groups of volunteers. Great work! Thank you Kathy Nakajima and all who gave a helping hand. You can see a picture of Kathy in this blogpost.

Julie and I first headed to quilt #17
 
where her basket of roses can be seen in the top row.
Just a few blocks away, in the corner we found the block that Pamela of Hokkaido Kudasai had submitted.
 Next to each quilt is a list of names (or in Pamela's case, a description) and location of each contributor.
My Peace Dove with Olive Branch had flown into quilt #28
where it had joined a number of other creatures, dogs with flower wreaths or bears with flowers sprouting out of their noses! To make it fully clear that this block has Swedish connections, the Dove is carrying a blue and yellow flag and I am dressed in the Swedish national folk costume.

Here are some other blocks in various techniques (sorry for not mentioning the makers' names):



The Japanese Manga boom can be seen in these blocks, too!

More facts
Before we go on to the Japanese 'Wa' quilts here are some statistics for you.

1487 quilts were submitted for entry into the contest. 386 passed the second screening and made it to the show. Of 17 quilts from abroad, 2 were let in.

102 Traditional
72 Original Design
42 Wa (which means Japanese in either fabric (kimono silk, indigo...) motif (cherry blossoms, festivals...) technique (sashiko, origami...)
35 Junior
90 Framed (the 'quilts' must be inside a picture frame, many feature embroidery and no real quilting)
45 Bags

Wa quilts

Now for a feast of Japanese culture.
 秋光 by 伊藤トヨ子
 六角遊びを楽しんで by 福西和代
 花窓(夜桜) by 小倉いち子
集う by 出町睦子 is made up of tiny balls of kimono fabric
 鎮守の祭りピーヒャララ by 渋谷きよみ
 ふくしまより 桜だより by 全田百合子
 秋の始まり by 松本紀代子
輝き by 松saki?靖枝
Julie is as impressed with this quilt as people were with Julie's stunning wearable quilt!
 藍のクラスター by 轟はる美

28 comments:

  1. how amazing to get so many charity quilts made from the blocks, it is a lovely idea, maybe festival of quilts should do something similar. Some beauties here Queenie, the one that really catches my eye is the crazy one with a winking cat.

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Organising the Partnership project is not for the light-hearted. You need 'military strategy' and 'DISCIPLINE' to complete this task. However, I guess it is a great idea to attract the crowds. I mean, if you have made a block you want to see it in a quilt, so you go to the show, and you make your friends tag along. The result is that MANY tickets are sold!

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  2. Gee, your second post and I am still sorting through my photos. (and it seems to be taking forever!)

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    1. I know, writing these posts take time, so take your time. It is not a race! I am so happy that you have blogged about different quilts.

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  3. Don't you and Julie look stunning in your respective outfits? I feel as if I've been to the show with you, thank you for another detailed report and all the wonderful pictures. The Wa quilts are leaving me speechless! I love the idea of the blocks, off to look at the site. Sleep well and dream of quilts and maybe crowds!

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    1. Put on a 'costume' in Japan if you want to become a photo model. Walk around with a friend who's clad in a quilt and you won't progress far!
      There were surprisingly few Wa quilts this year.

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  4. Thank you for sharing this event (and for pointing out my block!) How nice to see you in the Swedish national folk costume. Did you make it yourself?

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    1. It was a joy to go in search of your block. I hope to do it again next year, or maybe you will be here to lead me to it!
      I cheated on the costume, and had it made to order, but I have made the belt bag myself.

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  5. Another selection of lovely quilts, the partnership quilt is a beauty! Nice to see you in your costume.

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    1. The partnership quilts are very INTERESTING, you can actually stand for ages and look at all the different block (130!) in just one quilt.
      The costume is wool and perfect for winter in Tokyo. Celebrating Swedish Midsummer in the humidity of June is another story!!!

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  6. So nice to see you in your folk costume, Queenie, and of course your peace dove, lovely. .And thank you for coming to my blog -and your lovely words - I enjoy the photos of the quilt expo. It is really a special event with the princess. All so very orderly and disciplined.

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    1. I have little experience of quilt shows - I go regularly only to FOQ in Birmingham and the shows in Yokohama and Tokyo. That means I can't compare them with other major shows in USA, Australia or Europe, but I wanted to give a picture of the 'atmosphere' of these Japanese ones as I think they are quite different.

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  7. What fabulous photos! I have only recently discovered Japanese quilting and have been reading and researching about it on line. What a treat to discover your blog and these wonderfully inspiring photos. Thanks you. Looking forward to catching up with your blog following you.

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    1. Thanks for your kind words, Rose. In Japan it is very common that you pick a style and then devote your quilting life to that. This is especially true of the famous quilters, who hone their skills to perfection, then hand on the tricks to their students/followers.

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  8. I just love your outfits. It is so lovely that you take the time to show the quilts.

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    1. Thanks! It is a pleasure to share the show with others via my blog.

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  9. Wow, so many details and lovely work! I'm intrigued with the quilt featuring balls this time.

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    1. Of course you are! I think that quilt is just up your sleeve. In the past many Japanese quilters made copies of Baltimore albums, Amish and Log cabin quilts. Year by year there is now much more originality, and this is such an example.

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  10. absolutely magnificent! Queenie - you are just darling - in what you write and present to us (and in visiting our blogs) but in photos as well! I do so hope to meet you and Margaret sometime :) reading the statistics helps me realize how incredible it is to be a part of this show - and the partnership quilts are incredible...10519 blocks! each photo I am going back to again and again!! this one in particular fascinates me 秋の始まり by 松本紀代子 - autumn starting (?) the entire quilt moves and "is growing"- it just presents the "feeling" of autumn - beautiful

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    1. Thank you for your kind words, Jennifer.
      You can actually stand for ages and look at the Partnership blocks - each and every block has beauty, originality or technique to be discovered.
      You are good at reading and writing Japanese, I see! Yes, Ms Matsumoto's 'The Start of Autumn' is spectacular. Floral quilts are very popular and the Red Spider Lily is a much loved autumnal flower. The red contrasts so well with the light blue and purple. The sky is cleverly pieced of kimono fabric.

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  11. I didn't know ANY of that information you gave about the quilt show! Fascinating! And you really got some great photos of the exhibits. I'm going to send my friends around to your blog!

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    1. Spend some money of the (very costly, but high quality) catalogue. Spend some time deciphering the Japanese text and you get at the statistics.
      Did you watch the TV broadcast yesterday? They estimate 200.000 visitors!!
      I hope your friends can enjoy the blogpost. If not Google Translate might amuse them!

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  12. Wow! some fantastic quilts. All that detail and hand stitching. I bet you were a hit in your national costume, you look great.

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    1. I didn't see a quilt that wasn't interesting in some way. In many of them the craftsmanship is out of this world.
      Yes, I became a photo model for a day!

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  13. So many beautiful quilts, thanks for sharing!

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    1. You have a really good eye for details so I am sure you would love to be here and see them up close.

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  14. Oh, I am really enjoying your posts about the show! So great seeing you in folk costume with your peace dove block - and a glimpse of Julie too - just puts a smile on my face.

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    1. Julie is a riot to walk around with, we see so many different things. At the same time we notice exactly the same things, if you see what I mean!

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