Friday, 17 February 2017

Friday Homework for Lesson 11: Knotted Satin Stitch

Time to hand in the homework for this week's stitch - the Knotted Satin Stitch.
It looked so innocently easy and simple, but I found it was a willful stitch, behaving well until it suddenly started misbehaving. The 'knot' is not a proper knot, but a loop, and frets along the straight stitch it is looped around. It will not sit still! I renamed it the Naughty Knotted Satan Stitch!

When I introduced the stitch on my blog last Sunday I had worked the sampler on Aida and THAT was my first mistake; the holes in Aida are spaced wide apart. For this stitch you need a much tighter woven fabric.
My second mistake was that while working I forgot that this is not a variation of Buttonhole stitch, but a Satin stitch that needs to be crowded and stitched tightly so it is kept in check. Look at the sloppy orange heart. Aren't those horrible Buttonhole stitches worked backwards?!

After a number of false starts I got a better result. By keeping the stitches this crowded, each one supports the next one. The 'knot' is hidden underneath and pads the edge of the Satin stitches, just like it should do.


Just for fun I worked one set of widely spaced stitches over another to create the two coloured half wheels. These stitches had even more 'ants in their pants' and did not sit still, not until I tied them down with the red edges.
On these red edges and the red stem the stitches are so short they create a cord like line as the knot underneath lifts the whole stitch.

Annet, who has a wealth of stitch knowledge, pointed out that Knotted Satin Stitch is Rope Stitch worked at a different angle. She is right of course, and while working I realized it is also a cousin of Coral stitch, which is why I made the two red bows with Coral stitch.
(This flower is to be made into a greeting card, and I took the liberty to add some other stitches, too, Stem, Lattice, and French Knots.)

Finally I just had to see if naughty stitches can behave better when the environment (the fabric) and their character (the thread) change:
I used a piece of slightly fuzzy cotton and experimented with yellow floss (three strands), pink Pearl and light blue wool thread. I stitched the Knotted Satin Stitch, the Rope Stitch and the Coral Stitch,
and they were not only obedient and compliant, but refined and polished.

The Naughty Knotted Satan Stitch became the Silky Knotted Satin Stitch of whom I am happy to have met.


19 comments:

  1. I am wondering if there is any advantage over just a regular satin stitch.

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    1. I am wondering the same thing, too. It DOES have a wee tilt being padded underneath the lower edge, but who notices such a minute feature?

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  2. The stitch looks like it is hard to get straight but you have mastered it and the design that you are stitching looks lovely!

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    1. The design is inspired from a piece of Crewel work, and I can well see that this stitch should be used for Crewel, stitched in wool. The fuzzy fibers of the yarn help to fill out any space created by a 'naughty can't-sit-still stitch'.
      I love the look of Crewel and should, one day in future, like to use this stitch again.

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  3. This is a very lovely post about satan stitches - I loved to read it - and it could happen that I will try to tame the naughty things one day. Can I go on reading without making the homework, Carin? Its great fun.

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    1. I write for my own pleasure, this blog is a kind of diary, to keep records of my needlework adventures. I had to record the frustration I felt about this stitch and to remind myself that embroidery is not always fun and easy.
      Please go on reading my homework, and 'go to school' on Sunday, too, when I will introduce a stitch starting with L.

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  4. Way to conquer the stitch! I love seeing the various threads and fabrics. Your stitching is lovely.

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    1. With patience you can conquer any tricky stitch, and I am glad I didn't give up trying on this one. However, I am not sure how often I will want to use it again. I see now that it is a true CREWEL stitch and is best worked in wool. Maybe for my next Swedish wool embroidery project....?

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  5. You do have patience to continue until you were happy with it.

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    1. As I live with, care for and am in constant awareness of elderly family members and dementia, I have grown more patient, even with my needlework. A good development for me, I think, but caused by something sad.

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  6. it is a naughty satin stitch. it is hard make neat stitch. your patience, perseverance and insight is really useful. thanks for sharing your homework.my attempts are here-
    https://jizee6687.wordpress.com/2017/02/18/sss-11-knotted-satin-stitch-peacock-inside-paisley-1/

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    1. I am glad if I am not the only one who found it hard. It was a nice challenge, though, and I found improvement in the end. Now I'l head over to your blog and check out your work.

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  7. Beautiful results, naughty or nice. Thanks for sharing your interesting process, I enjoy that!

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    1. Ha, ha! it feels good now that I have completed lesson 11 and moved on to the next stitch which is much easier.

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  8. Great post Queenie! It is interesting to read how you have tested this stitch until you are happy with it! Love the Crewel pattern. Did you draw it or have a transfer?
    Barbara x

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    1. Thank you!
      I copied it free hand from a Crewel pattern.
      They are not difficult to make; draw a heart, add a couple of wings and ears and a few rat tails.... Give it a try!

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  9. Wow, that was quite a struggle! The knotted satin stitch looks nice in wool.

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    1. I need more practice! As you know some stitches are difficult to learn and get to grips with, once you are over that threshold it gets easier. Yes, it is best when stitched with wool.

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  10. You sure made a pretty flower out of all that!

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