Sunday, 22 October 2017

Sunday Stitch School - Revision: Stitches 36 - 40

Welcome to Sunday Stitch School. The rain is pelting down here, so it is the perfect opportunity to stay indoors and study stitches!

Once again it is time for another revision lesson to sum up the last five stitches.

Click on the headline to see instructions and homework.

I have found another name for this stitch: New England Laid Stitch.
It is great for filling, makes a nice 'Satin Stitch' look and does not need a Split Stitch outline.


37 Hungarian Stitch
This stitch makes such a lovely pattern on canvas.

Easy and quick.

Oh, how easy it is to make swelling flower buds, seeds and pebbles!

This is an unusual stitch, great for outlines and other linear work.


Revision Homework:
Stitch this Sunbonnet Sue sampler, 'cheat' with crayons and molding mat.

16 comments:

  1. I'm intrigued by your idea of "cheating"!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I cheated with crayons and molding mat to make the kimono pattern in the latest Sunbonnet Sue.
      http://queeniepatch.blogspot.jp/2017/09/friday-revision-homework-stitches-31-35.html
      it is a smart method of 'dyeing' your own fabric, or do fake appliqué.
      I am forever the Cheat!

      Delete
  2. I wouldn't call it cheating, it's just a different technique.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, you are right. AND it is a fun and quick way to add colour. Think of filling in an area just because you want it coloured.

      Delete
  3. This is not cheating, people have been 'colouring or painting' fabric and then working over it for 100's of years. It just got forgotten for a while. Have a look at Rustique Interiors work. ( http://www.rustique.scot) Appliqué, embroidery, patchwork and Painting the surface.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I did have a look at the link: Great pieces of furniture.
      Yes, crayons is just another method of playing with fabric!

      Delete
  4. Lovely to see the revision work and see the method of cheating. I was gifted some Crayola sticks and now I know what to do with them....Cheat too. Playtime coming up.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Don't forget to place a piece of baking parchment or kitchen tissue between the crayoned fabric and the hot iron!

      Delete
  5. I am catching up with your stitches, love the use of the crayons, very innovative and a clever idea.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You can actually achieve a beautiful result by shading an area. Often appliqué means a solid shade for the appliqué piece, unless you have some marbled or space dyed fabric.

      Delete
  6. Lovely stitches and great use of the crayons!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I like the pattern on your molding mat. I'm sure it will help you to make another pretty Sue!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. These small molding mats have three patterns each. They are ok for small areas but if you want to make a larger pattern, the overlay is difficult to produce.

      Delete
  8. I have decided to do some of my banner with a bit of embroidery. I will have to go back and study some of your stitches.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Use the simplest stitches you can think of. A quilt or banner should not be 'spoiled' with embroidery that is too fancy - unless it is a crazy quilt, that is.

      Delete

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