Friday, 13 May 2016

Paper Foundation Piecing

I was asked about Paper Foundation Piecing, the technique used for my new quilt project, Trinity Green.

Here are some pictures to show MY process:

First I draw and cut out triangles.
I use either rotary cutter or scissors.


I then draw and xerox copy paper slips of triangles.

 Next I place the triangles on the blank side of the paper. Two triangles, right sides facing, secured with a pin.

I turn the paper slip over and stitch by machine along the line.

With plenty of seam allowance, exact accuracy is not needed. At this stage, many quilters trim off excess fabric, but I leave it as it is; the bulk will make the quilt strong, I hope!

I flip open to check.

Next, I finger press, pin the next triangle in place, and carry on sewing until the row is completed.

 Later when the rows are stitched to other rows, or strips of fabric, the triangles will appear neat and accurate.
I try to place darker shades of green on one side and lighter on the other.






12 comments:

  1. Your pieces are so neat and the colour choices are perfect, I can see a fantastic quilt in the making!

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    Replies
    1. I hope it won't look too chaotic with all the shades and prints.

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  2. Great information. I am inspired to do one like this.

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    Replies
    1. It is supposed to be the most accurate form for machine quilting, but I tell you it is BORING!

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  3. thanks Queenie for sharing how you do these triangles have not tried any FPPing as it always looks so complicated maybe now I will have a go. Need more hours in the day for all I want to do.

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    1. You can always download a simple pattern from the internet and do one block. A tulip or a coffee mug e.g.

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  4. What a great lesson you've shared. The triangles look good and I like the light/dark plan.

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    1. With so many prints and shades I felt I needed two sets of order; 1) the simple shape of a triangle, 2) the balance and contrast between darker and lighter fabric. I am still wondering how messy the quilt will look.

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  5. The variety in print and texture is exciting!

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    1. I haven't counted the number of prints and pieces of plain fabric, but I had a lot of GREEN.

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  6. Thanks for showing how you did this.

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