Thursday, 23 January 2014

13th Tokyo International Great Quilt Festival, 2014 - Part 1

I was very fortunate to have been invited to attend the Opening Ceremony. I asked my friend Julie of My Quilt Diary to join me. Julie will also be reporting from the show so do head over to read her blog posts.

The show is held in Tokyo Dome, a gigantic indoor baseball field. The opening ceremony is a serious affair as you can see from these pictures.
 On the left are four men representing Tokyo Dome, NHK (the Japanese state run broadcasting company that is the organiser of the show), Yomiuri newspaper and other sponsors.
The lady in front of the golden folding screen is Kiko, Princess Akishino, a representative of the Imperial Family.
On the right you can see some other important guests, among them the Ambassador of Finland and his wife, with a translator behind them. Five of these people made speeches. Note how the officials wear white pompom ribbons and the guests red.


The show was officially opened by a ribbon cutting ceremony. Even the highly polished scissors are bedecked with ribbons, and look at the three attendants in the background; smart suits, perfectly knotted scarves, white gloves and one of them is holding the black lacquer tray on which the scissors are placed. That's formality for you!

Once all these ceremonies were completed, we were let onto the field to see the quilts. We had 45 minutes before the show opened to the public and the arena would fill up. Julie and I headed for the Traditional quilts of the Contest.

アラスカのダリア by 小坂妃佐子

感謝の贈物 by 山内京子


 オアシスから吹く風の庭 by 日比野香代子
Notice the quilt pattern.
テノチティトランの太陽 by 加納幹
This quilt is similar in colours but look at the fantastic pattern! The sashing is Mola quilting.
ヘキサゴンinダイヤモンド by 花田操
An organised crazy quilt.
 花と風車 by 伊藤千津子
Lovely Colonial knots!

至福の時間 by 枝野さとみ
Ms Edano has turned a traditional Amish pattern into a trapunto quilt!
バラの小径 by 中島豊子
Pure perfectionism!
フラワーカーニバル by 寺田矢枝子
Here is a detail of Suffolk Puff/yo-yo quilt. Can you see that they are all joined together?
 彩る by 土井直子
This is a Korean form of patchwork called Pojagi and a detail of the seams can be seen below.
春風の恵み by 中村崇子
Here is a detail of one of the very Japanese taupe quilts; flowers and bees.

I am sorry I have often shown just details rather than the whole quilts. People get in the way, the light is not always good (see the shadow of the first yellow quilt) or the quilts are so large you can not back away far enough to catch the entire quilt.

More tomorrow!


31 comments:

  1. Oh my, such talent! Thank you so much for showing the details...such an inspiring group of photos. Even though I shall never achieve such levels of master quiltmaking...it is glorious to dream of that and be inspired to just keep stitching. I loved reading about the ceremony too, thanks again.
    Hugs,
    Kathy

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  2. Thanks for your kind words.
    I think blogging is a great way of sharing these big events that obviously a lot of people can never visit personally. I hope to show some of the 'Japanese' flair that sets this show apart from others.

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  3. This is a great event. So many beautiful quilts.

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  4. some real beauties here Queenie, what a ceremony for the opening and it meant you were able to get some great pictures before the public were allowed in. Will pop over now and check out your friends blog

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    1. Yes, we got a head start! Impossible to take pictures because of the crowds after that.

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  5. Really amazing quilts, and lucky you to get in ahead of the crowds. If I lived for a hundred years, and practiced every day I'd never reach that level of skill. My favourites though are the Suffolk puff quilt, which looks like a meadow of flowers, and the Korean quilt (even though it seems much simpler than some of the others.

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    1. I would say that at the Tokyo show you can see the cream of Japanese quilting. There were two Pojagi 'quilts'. The silk is transparent, there is only a single layer and they are so light they move when people walk past them.
      The Suffolk puff quilt was so full of structure!

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  6. Hello,
    thank you very much! I took the liberty of mentioning this article on a French quilters forum. I hope you don't mind.
    Beatrice.

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    Replies
    1. Of course not. I hope many who has no opportunity to visit the show can enjoy it online.

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  7. Just brilliant, the show looks fantastic! My favourite quilts are the two rose ones, they are so pretty.

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    1. They are my favourites, too. It would be such a delight to walk around the show with you!

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    2. The formality of the Opening Ceremony is very apparent in your pictures, I imagine the timing was spot on too. How lovely to have the less crowded start to your quilt viewing. The quilts seem formal too, controlled and perfectly executed.

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    3. The pojabi is lovely, so delicate and I can only marvel at the floral quilts and know that I will never ever approach that level of intricate design and execution. The work of Japanese quilters always amazes me.

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  8. Thank you for sharing your photos with us. Those quilts are spectacular! I would love to be able to get to this show.

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    1. Thank you Dorothy,
      There are indeed many great quilts to look at, and study in detail - if you can get close enough to see - one's view is often blocked by hundreds of heads!

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  9. This is a most beautiful quiltshow - perfect craftsmanship - I am in awe! A pity that not all photos want to open. Is it the error of my iPad?

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    1. You said it, a great show!
      Sorry to hear about your problems with the photos. I have made very 'picture heavy' blogposts.

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  10. All potos opened on a second visit - I am so glad.

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  11. Queenie - thank you so much for reporting on the show - it's a nice consolation since I can't be there!

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    1. Oh, Cynthia, you would have loved it. Head over to Julie's post to read her report.

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  12. Some very talented people! I'm intrigued with the Suffolk puff one.

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    1. Among the Suffolk puffs were circles of gathered ribbon and some leaves as well. Every item was connected to another one with beautiful braid or Buttonhole bars.

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  13. Thank you Queenie for sharing your experiences and pictures of these quilts. this is the first time a desire was fulfilled without me even wishing for it, because I never knew about this . you have opened a new world, thank you once again, keep up the good work and congrats!

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    1. How nice to hear your words, Chitra! Yes, I think a quilt show can be a real eye opener and you enter into another world.

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  14. I, too, just marvel at them all - my mouth drops open as I sit here looking - just beautiful - the taupe quilt is so lovely ; and 花と風車 by 伊藤千津子, (flower and windmill) colonial knots in white on blue, with the swiftly moving pinwheels

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    1. There are many taupe quilts - typically Japanese, and very difficult to make, and photograph! I thought the Colonial knots were so evenly made on that blue quilt. Fantastic work!

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  15. thank you for taking the time to post these. not in my wildest dreams will i ever get to japan to see this show..in a bitter cold winter a wonderful treat

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    1. Sorry I have not replied to this comment earlier! It was a pleasure to share the show with those who could not make it.

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  16. thank you so much for sharing

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