Monday, 18 November 2013

Yokohama International Quilt Week 2013 - Miniature quilts

One part of the Yokohama International Quilt Week is the Miniature contest. The quilts should measure 50 cm x 50 cm, and be entered under either the Traditional, Contemporary, Wa (Japanese style) or Pictorial category.

This was a good year with more Miniature quilts than I have seen in a long time.

Let me start with the winner: Akemi Tajima's 'Shoka. Yureru Poppy'
田島明美*初夏。ゆれるポピー

I got a comment from my friend Lis that the quilts were very colourful this year. It is true also about the miniatures so let's ooze out some more orange:
'Sekijitsu' by Kinue Ishigame
昔日*石亀絹恵

'Australia gensan burashi-no-ki wo anata ni puresento' made by Sanae Funabashi
 More and more embroidery is being used in quiltmaking.
オーストラリア原産ブラシの木をあなたにプレセント*船橋さな江
There is embroidery and a tree in the next quilt, too!
'Jingle Bell ga naru toki' by Tomiko Hiramatsu
 How about this way of using our TAST stitches?
ジングルベルが鳴る時*平松トミ子
Many want to celebrate that Mt Fuji has been added to UNESCO's list of World Heritage Sites and here is Taeko Hanae's 'Fujisan 2013'
富士山 2013*花枝妙子
'Ribbon and ribbon' by Yoshiko Koguchi
Ribbon and ribbon*湖口佳子
'Sensu' by Tomoko Kuniyoshi is in the style of orderly crazy quilt.


扇*国吉那子
Another crazy quilt is my own 'JET BLACK', heavy with TAST stitches. The picture is a bit blurred, but you might have seen better pictures of it when I worked on this quilt last summer, autumn and winter. The last blog entry is here.

'FROM HAWAII' by Yoshiko Kinoshita.
FROM HAWAII*木下佳子
Another summer flower,
'Summer Flower' made by Mariko Hayasaki
Summer Flower*早崎麻利子
Several groups of quilters had made one quilt each on the same theme or design. One set was, what I guess is shadow quilting over a crayoned base fabric. One of the quilts is
'Kibo' by Mariko Tanaka.
希望*田中麻里子
'Kibo' means hope so let us hope that there will be another quilt show at Yokohama next November filled with good quilts.


23 comments:

  1. Ooo, thanks so much for showing these! I love miniatures. And, these are some most unusual ones.

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    1. I love miniatures, too, but this year there were so many (I have shown just a handful) that after a while my head was spinning!

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  2. It is interesting to see all that embroidery included. I saw the same kind of thing on quilts in New Zealand but hardly anthing here. Great photos again. Many thanks.

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    1. In Australia you take embroidery very seriously and do a 'proper' piece. Here it is often used to add a bit of pizzazz to a quilt.

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  3. Just wonderful mini quilts, including your Jet Black. It must have been a thrill to be part of the show!

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    1. Seeing one's own work at a show visited by thousands of people is always a thrill. Unfortunately, this time my quilt was badly hung (bottom row) and with the crowds it was a bit hard to see.

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  4. wow what a collection, there is so much tallent and work gone into these quilts! My favourite one is the embroidered Christmas tree, I think the idea and work that has gone into it is fantastic, so many colours ans stitches it is beautiful.

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    1. It is one of my favourites, too. I instantly thought of the many TAST participants who work with felt and make small items, fridge magnets, Christmas tree decorations, pincushions and the like.

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  5. I like the Jingle bell quilt,what a lovely way to showcase all the stitches! My favorite quilt is 'From Hawaii'.Appliqué is too good,the depth created by the colors especially blue is awesome.Thanks for sharing.

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    1. The Hawaiian quilt is lovely and beautifully made with that depth and those colours.
      Hawaii is a popular resort destination and many travellers bring back memories that they put into a quilt.
      Kathy Nakajima is a quilt teacher famous for her fantastic Hawaiian quilts, and she has done much to spread the popularity for this type of quilting.

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  6. Such beautiful mini quilts, my favourite size. It must have been fun to see your quilt on the show. Again thanks for sharing these.

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    1. 50 cm x 50 cm is a neat size for a quilt to be displayed on the wall. It can be hard to fit everything in, in such limited space, or if you want to do a scaled down quilt the pieces become very small.
      I am glad you liked the display.

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  7. I have just looked through all of the quilts you have shown they are amazing I couldn't possibly pick a favorite I love them all. How on earth do they quilt the giant ones. Like the idea for the tast stitches on the christmas tree. Thank you for taking the time to display these on your blog.

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    1. Thank YOU for appreciating this 'online quilt show'.
      I, too, have often wondered how the huge quilts are made and by whom. Patchwork Tsushin, the organisers, might have written in their magazines, but I am not a frequent reader, and their two web sites, in Japanese and English, have much to wish for...

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  8. What a feast for the eyes!. Thanks for sharing, love the close-ups.

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  9. Lots of colour and embroidery too. The crayoned one looks very interesting.

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    1. Quilt tops embellished with crayon drawings have become popular in England, too. At Yokohama they had toped the drawing with a very shiny piece of organza and then stitched along the crayon lines. It gave the quilt a very 'spacy' look. There was another series of quilts made in the same way but with a drawing of hydrangeas and the organza made the flowers look damp with rainy season moisture.

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  10. This is a beautiful and so interesting collection of "mini"-quilts - which are not so mini at all. Each of them is wonderful to look at - and to steal ideas.....

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    1. What does Miniature mean? That is a good question in quilt making. At Festival of Quilts in Birmingham it means a scaled down version of a large quilt design within the max size of 30 cm x 30 cm. At Yokohama it is a small quilt of any scale. Maybe because homes are small and cramped in Japan, such items as bags, table runners and small wall hangings are popular.
      Do feel free to 'steal' some ideas!

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  11. THANK THANK YOU THANK YOU! Quilts by the Japanese ladies are my all time favorites...somehow they go above and beyond other quilts. What a treat!!!!

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  12. These mini quilts all look so wonderful! I love this size of quilt and it was really great to see how many had embroidery on them. Thank you so much for sharing all these pictures with us!!

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    1. I have made a number of miniature quilts like these and they are very easy to change around for a new look each month; a quilt calendar if you know what I mean. That would be difficult with a larger quilt maybe. They are easier to finish as well!

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