Wednesday, 31 July 2013

WIPW - kavelfrans or woolly worm

Work In Progress Wednesday. Go to Pintangle for reports and eye candy.

Today my report is on the wrist warmers in Swedish wool embroidery I am making.
After completing the embroidery, I lined and top stitched the wrist bands.

Next came the wooden stick, and bleeding fingers!

The pictures below illustrate how the wool is wrapped around the stick and then stitched together into a fringe.
It does not show, however,  how many times I pricked my fingers, how the needle slid, how the thread cut into the flesh each time I tightened the thread, nor how many drops of blood tinted the wool!



I changed the colour whenever I wanted to and got a colourful 'woolly worm', that skinned my fingers when I tried to pull it off the stick. What does one not do for one's passion of embroidery!
I made four 'worms'.
Next I stitched two 'worms' on each embroidered band, cut the loops open and trimmed the 'fur'. Finally I held the fur over the spout of a steaming kettle to fluff up the fibres.



See what beauty is going to keep my hands warm on cold winter days in Tokyo. I will have fond memories of my hardship.

After completing this step, I found this neat way of making the same kind of kavelfrans/fringe/woolly worm.
Go and have a look.

18 comments:

  1. I wondered what you were going to do with that popsicle stick. Your wrist warmers are beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Pamela
      In the link at the end of my post the other lady used a plastic belt for tieing up parcles instead of an ice cream stick. Such a smart idea, much more flexible. Now I know how to save my fingers!!

      Delete
  2. Such a gorgeous wrist warmer! Thanks for sharing the link to the alternative way of making the fringe. It makes a very nice edge.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Annet.
      Yes, I am pleased with the result but will try out the 'other' method once I am back in Japan where I have access to my crochet hooks.

      Delete
  3. Your wrist warmers are looking very pretty. And now I know how to make a fringe in two ways - the alternative way looks like it would be less painful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for your kind words. I just have to try the alternative way to see how much less pain is involved, ha, ha!

      Delete
  4. WOW!! This wrist warmer is awesome!!beautifully embroidered with bright colors and the the fringe made it prettier!! Thanks for the tutorial.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know you love - and are good at - crocheting so this might be a good way for you to add a fringe to your work.

      Delete
  5. your worms look fantastic Queenie, hopped over to the link for the easier way but it does not look as effective as yours, practice makes perfect they say!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I will try out the other method as soon as I get back to Tokyo and can use a crochet hook. The fringe I made is pretty, but I don't want to prick my fingers again!

      Delete
  6. Fabulous work, practical and beautiful :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have leaned that if you keep your neck, wrists and ankles warm, then the rest of the body will stay warm(ish), too. It if often impractical to wear gloves but these wrist bands will hopefully work well.

      Delete
  7. That wooly worm is wonderful. (excuse the illiteration.) It really does set of the cuff and highlights the colours in the embroidery.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Woooollllly worm... it is too difficult to spell and I missed it on my first post, had to return to edit it, ha, ha.

    ReplyDelete

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