Sunday, 17 September 2017

Sunday Stitch School - Lesson 36: Rumanian Stitch

Welcome back to another geography lesson here at Sunday Stitch School. The focus today is on Europe with the Rumanian Stitch.
It is also spelt Romanian Stitch, and has these other names, Antique Stitch, Economy Stitch, Janina Stitch, Oriental Stitch and Indian Filling Stitch.
In Swedish it is called Rumänsk Söm.
In French, Point Roumain or Point Roman. (Thanks Mattia)

I came across this stitch in the library book  'American Crewel Embroidery' by Keiko Arakawa.

Ms Arakawa explains that it is the main stitch used for filling in plants and animals in American Crewel embroidery. It was developed by the early settlers in New England in the 17th century to save yarn and is therefore also known as Economy Stitch. It is a surface stitch which leaves only little wool on the reverse side.

It was not until I checked Rumanian Stitch in other stitch dictionaries and on the internet that I found that the traditional (English Crewel) Rumanian Stitch is 'uneconomical' and uses up considerably more crewel wool.

Compare:
Traditional way 1-5                                       American Crewel way A - E



I have worked the stitches in Perle on Aida to show clearly where the needle enters and exits, but this should of course like all Crewel Embroidery be worked in wool on linen. Then the stitches will fill the motif beautifully.

On my Aida sampler:


Homework:
Trace a floral design from the book, and fill in the petals and leaves with the 'economical' Rumanian Stitch.






22 comments:

Rachel said...

Yes, it's a useful stitch - especially, as you say, when economy is a consideration.

Pamela said...

I like reading the story of the stitch, in addition to seeing how it is done!

Queeniepatch said...

It also makes it thinner. I
f you are working wool embroidery for something that needs to be sturdy (upholstery, bag etc) a thick layer of yarn on the back is better, though.

Queeniepatch said...

It is a very easy and pleasing stitch. Instant satisfaction!

Chitra Gangadharan said...

I enjoy reading the details of all the stitches. looking at the thread saving version reminds me of Cretan stitch.

FlashinScissors said...

Interesting to read your story about Rumanian stitch. When I first saw the Rumanian stitch thought it was the same stitch I had been using on my "water" themed tapestry earlier in the year, but after checking in my book of needlepoint stitches I found I had been using Crossed Gobelin stitch. My stitch was quite similar to yours, and it is another good filling stitch too!
Barbara x

Janie said...

I like that stitch and enjoy the story behind it too.
I'm looking forward to seeing the flower design worked.
Thanks for sharing.

Deepa said...

Right now I am not thinking about the stitch, but about how big your embroidery book collection is :) ;) Would like a sneak peek into your craft room and book shelf one day :)

Julie Fukuda said...

I guess it would be nice if you didn't want any toe-grabbers on the back side.

Queeniepatch said...

Yes, it would be a half Cretan Stitch with the stitched placed very close to each other.
Do you know anything about the name Indian Filling Stitch?

Queeniepatch said...

Would it be a half Crossed Goblin Stitch?

Queeniepatch said...

It is a fun stitch and works up very quickly.

Queeniepatch said...

I don't have that many books, and this one comes from the public library, it is not mine at all and I have to hurry to get it back to the library.

Queeniepatch said...

Ha, ha!
Wool embroidery on bed linen? At the foot end of sheets? It could of course be a good way if you didn't want any 'finger-grabbers'!

Annet said...

Another pretty stitch I never tried! Enjoy stitching your flowers!

FlashinScissors said...

It was a complete cross stitch, but going from memory and at first sight the two stitches looked quite similar, and I had to check my book to see where they differed! So, now I know!
Barbara x

crazyQstitcher said...

I like both versions of the stitch.

Queeniepatch said...

I have only seen it in this book, in Mary Thomas's Dictionary of Embroidery Stitches and on an Indian online video.
It works up very fast, and does save thread!

Queeniepatch said...

So do I, but they are very different in look.

Anonymous said...

Bonjour
Encore un point intéressant que je n'ai jamais encore utilisé
(Je suis presque débutante)
Le nom français de ce point est :
- Point roumain ou Point roman (et encore d'autres aussi)
Merci
Mattia

Queeniepatch said...

Thank you Mattia.
I will update the blog post with your French name.

Tanya said...

And there I have my answer to my comment earlier... you can see I'm reading your posts backwards...