Friday, 7 March 2014

TAST #102 Beaded Triangular Buttonhole Stitch

TAST stitch #102, Beaded Triangular Buttonhole Stitch, is as nice as its un-beaded version, that we worked last week (TAST #101).
To learn how to master it, head over to Pintangle.

I worked one row in blue 'jeans thread' and bugle beads, and a mirrored row in Cotton a Broder and seed beads.



Bead Control
What do you do about bead control? Do you have any problems with stitching with beads, keeping the beads from rolling around everywhere,  storing beads...?

Sharon gave us the advice to use a tapestry 26 needle, and I think that is sound advice, but not all beads have a hole that is large enough even for such a needle.

My advice in such a case, is to use either a milliners needle, or a needle threader like in the picture below.
These needle threaders aren't the best to stitch with, but they can handle any thread and slide through small holes in beads.
Another tip is to remove the needle and slide the thread into the bead and then thread the needle again. It takes a lot of time and is a bother, but if you do this, I recommend using bond to stiffen the tip of the thread. I wrote about this technique here.
How do you store your beads and keep them under control?
I store mine in small containers.
I also have a small triangular dish to keep the beads in while stitching; the corners make it easy to tip the left over beads back into the container.
Then I have this neat blue 'tacky bead mat' from Beadalon. It is the ultimate 'bead grip'.
Do you have any tips or idea to share?

30 comments:

  1. Your samples look great.
    I use #12 short bead needles for stitching beads. The eye, as well as the needle itself, is small so it fits through the seed beads, but will not accommodate thick threads.
    To keep my beads under control while I'm stitching, I use a "furry" bead mat on a tray.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, don't you find the short bead needle too short? My aunt-in-law used to have a 'furry' bead mat that I would love to use, but I can't find it...

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  2. I love this stich with the beads

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    Replies
    1. It is a nice stitch, but if you use only one bead it kind of drowns in the stitch, so it is a 'bead eater'.

      Delete
  3. I store my beads in film canisters and I use those triangular dishes too. I have never seen the sticky mat but I bet it would be useful. I have only done native American beading on a loom or making a medallion. I love using Japanese beads because they are so uniform in size and I rarely have problems with getting the threaded needle through the holes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Film canisters, well that takes me back!
      The stitcky Beadalon mat is great for picking up spilled beads, also it sits firmly on the table top.
      Have you ever used the 'soroban' beads that, I believe, are a Japanese invention?

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  4. Beads can be a problem, I always use a very thin needle which can be difficult to thread, I haven't come across the sort of needle threaders that you have shown, they look like they could be a good idea. I store my beads in any small containers that I have but no matter what I put them in at some point I am guaranteed to tip the pot over and then have to search for them in the carpet!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If you drop a tin of pins you can pick them up with a magnet. It is much harder to retrieve spilled beads. Actually the tacky bead mat is quite good at 'sucking up beads (from wooden floors anyway). If I am pouring out many beads, I might put the mat or the little tray inside a box to avoid spills.

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  5. it is beautiful Queenie..looks nice as border..thanks for sharing the idea

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    1. Yes, isn't this stitch good for a border, but I have also seen them as detached stitches, and they looked good there, too.

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  6. Perfect rows of beaded triangular buttonhole stitches. The needle threader looks very useful. I will enquire about the sticky mat. I love such tricks.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They might be perfect rows, but boy, did I like your free form of this stitch! I think used as detached stitches they make up fantastic designs.
      The needle threader is great as any thick thread can be inserted, e.g. fluffy yarn that is actually thin enough for a bead but too furry to thread on an ordinary needle. The mat is a great 'trick' too.

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  7. What a great idea Queenie to 'mirror those beautiful stitches...they look amazing !
    Another idea that I may have to borrow from you.......You've given some sound advice on beading.....I've always used a piece of velvet to stop the beads rolling everywhere and it works well ! Is it still very cold where you are ? Here in the UK the forecast is positively 'tropical' for next week.....They're saying it will be warmer than Greece and Turkey !
    Hugs to you Queenie,
    Chris Richards
    xxxxx

    ReplyDelete
  8. I borrowed the mirrored design from another TAST member, Maureen of CrazyQstitcher.
    Velvet is good to keep the beads still(er) but I really like the velvety trays they have in jeweller's shops. The sides help to keep the beads in one place.
    Yes, it is very cold here in Tokyo. It snowed yesterday, and today, although the weather looks 'tropical' with strong sunshine, the air is icy cold.
    Have a great weekend, Chris.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I only once tried to do beading... (actually making a figure out of a bead kit), I couldn't see anything! And after reading your post I realize I probably was using the wrong type of needle... I didn't know there WERE special needles! (Though it makes sense since their are different needles for quilting, applique etc.) Lovely design!

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    Replies
    1. Beading NEEDLES are super thin, and difficult to use with thicker embroidery thread. Beading THREADERS are easy to thread with any thickness of thread/yarn and the shafts are so thin they easily pass through the holes of beads. However, they are flexible and difficult to grab, so not very good for SEWING.
      Isn't stitching challenging!

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  10. love these latest stitches Queenie. Good tips re the beading, never seen that funny needle before. I like you use a milliners needle but very small beads need beaders needles but they are so hard to thread! My beads are in tiny screw top jars, seem to have loads but do not often use them but they are getting a bit of use in my crazy work

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I was lucky to 'inherit' a lot of beads and beading tools from my aunt-in-law. It is so nice of Sharon to add these beaded TAST stitches and I can use my new toys!
      For crazy quilting, beads can always be added afterwards with thinner thread and needles. For EMBROIDERY though, I guess the beads should be stitch with the embroidery thread.

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  11. Replies
    1. Thank you , Carolyn. Are all your beads packed away?

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  12. Queenie, your mirrored version of the Beaded Triangular Buttonhole stitch is beautiful. I think it would make a great border as it is.

    I keep most of my beads in mini grip bags- sized to match the beads. These are stored in drawers and tins. I have a drawer tower? that is supposed to hold nuts and bolts.

    I covered a sheet of wood with a stick-on flat velour... similar to those Fuzzy Felt boards children used.. for when I beaded on a loom. This stick-on had been laying around for years and I would not know where to get more. Pity, as it really helps.
    I'm lucky too that my DH made me several wooden bowls to hold beads while I work.

    I usually use a #12 needle but bought a packet of #15 - a longer needle- one time. The first snapped the first time I tried to thread it. No pressure on the needle as I held it behind the eye.
    The second broke before the beading was completed so I stick with the #12 now.

    I've not heard of the needle threader.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am sorry to hear about the #15 needles. Were they the same make as the #12? I was tempted by a velvety board in a beading shop, but am pleased with the Beadalon sticky pad. It grabs the table as well as keeps the beads from moving around. When I want to take a break I can place a piece of plastic on top and not even the cat can get at the beads!
      I wonder what the next TAST stitch is and if there is a beaded version!

      Delete
  13. Your mirrored beaded traingular buttonhole stitches are beautiful. Thank you for your tips, I like your triangular dishes , they must be very useful, I just use the box lid.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The lid of the box is also a good idea, although the sharp corners on the triangular dish are good to 1) put the bead on the needle and 2) return unused beads to the box.
      I hope Sharon gives us lots of more beaded stitches!

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  14. I like to use thick threads and then have a problem with beads, so thanks for the tips, although I've never seen flexible bead threaders. I once recycled a cheese wedge box by sticking velvet to the bottom, then when finished for the day the lid could be put on to keep the remainder of the beads safe. I use plastic storage boxes with compartments for most of my beads.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, your work often features thick thread and with smaller beads you would have the 'threader' problem. I can highly recommend the bead threaders. Fluffy yarn can LOOK very thick but actually be thin enough to pass through even a small bead. In such a situation I would recommend stiffening and flattening the end of the yarn with bond. Once it is dry you have a sharp 'bead threader'.
      Good idea with the cheese wedge box, there is the 'spout' to return the beads to where you store them and the lid is a smart way to keep them safe when you take a bread.

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  15. I love your sample, Queenie. Great ideas for beading. I have to check for the availability of some things here, in Muscat.
    Chitra

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Beading can add a challenge to our ordinary TAST stitches. I think the tapestry #27 needle that Sharon recommends works beautifully but as many stitchers want to use knitting yarn or other strange materials I think the bead threaders are the best solution. Good luck with your shopping!
      I always enjoy looking at your many versions of each stitch. Keep up the good work, Chitra.

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  16. I working my way through old posts with TAST stitches I still have not stitched. Hopefully they will inspire me to start TAST-ing again. Love your beaded triangular buttonhole. Thanks for your advice on beading supplies, I just use my beads directly from my container and it doesn't always go the way I plan! A triangular dish would be great to use, but I never saw it a shop. Must have a look next time I'm going to my favourite craft shop.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If I feel lazy and use the beads directly from the container, I will however, place it in a large box to avoid spilling beads all over the table and floor. Pins you can always retrieve with a magnet, but beads, they go everywhere and won't be found until half a year later! The triangular dish is especially good when you want to return the beads to its small container or tube. I hope you will find it.

      Delete

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