Sunday, 15 April 2018

Sunday Stitch School - Lesson 57: Figure-Eight Knot Stitch ?

Today we have another easy stitch. Its name is not easy, however.

I found the stitch in 'Totsuka Embroidery Stitch Book 3 Arrangement' (戸塚刺しゅうステッチBOOK 3)
which is all about variations of the Chain Stitch.
There it goes under the name Figure-Eight Knot Stitch (8の字に糸をかけてとめる).

On a search online I have found a number of other stitches called Figure-Eight Stitch, among them is the Colonial Knot, and a most interesting knotted Running Stitch, that I might take up in another lesson.

Today I want to show you Madam Totsuka's Figure-Eight Knot Stitch as seen in the book above.
Should you recognize this stitch and have a name for it, please leave a comment.









I think it makes a very attractive detached stitch.

Homework:
Aida Sampler
Sunday Stitch School Reference Chart
Scribble something on the Scribble Cloth.









19 comments:

  1. It is a charming stitch, and I've never seen it before in my life!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You have a wide knowledge of embroidery so if you say you have never seen it in your life, I guess it is an original Japanese Totsuka invention.

      Delete
  2. Interesting look! Can't wait to see what you do with it!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Je ne connaissais pas non plus ce point en broderie,
    il est surtout utilisé en matelotage ou escalade,
    son nom français est :
    - figure de huit ou nœud de huit
    Voilà
    Mattia

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Mattia
      This is the Google Translation of your comment:
      I did not know this point in embroidery,
      it is mostly used in seamanship or climbing,
      his french name is:
      - figure of eight or knot of eight
      here
      Mattia
      Yes, I think Figure of Eight is a knot used by seamen. As a stitch it needs to be worked in thread and in and out of fabric.

      Delete
  4. looks like an interesting stitch.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Another fun discovery to experiment with!
    It looks very useful in decoration and in everyday life.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, this is a quick and fun stitch, but it is not very obedient - you need to keep the stitches small so they don't loose their shape.

      Delete
  6. It looks very similar to Braid stitch. The wrap is different.
    Let me see if I can master this one.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is easy to do , but difficult to master. Why? Because it has an unruly bottom loop!

      Delete
  7. An interesting stitch - what I am wondering about: The name —- because the number eight is looking quite different in Japanese writing ....

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are quite right, eight written in kanji (the Chinese characters used in Japanese writing) looks like to slanting vertical lines 八 but it can of course also be written in Arabic numbers 8, and that is what Madam Totsuka refers to.

      Delete
    2. Thank you, Queenie! I noted some important numbers when we have been to Japan.

      Delete
    3. You are very observant! I bet you have many more detailed memories of Japan and other places you have visited.

      Delete
    4. This little bit of paper of a notebook is kept in a tiny drawer already more than 20 years ....so memories are constantly renewed - regarding Japanese numbers. I also drew the figures, you know, and mine was not very different from yours. I am nearly proud of my storage system, ha!

      Delete
  8. I've never seen it until I looked at Maureen's blog tonight and saw the flower she did with it. Thank you for the detailed picture of how to do it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is nice to discover unusual stitches, isn't it?

      Delete

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