Wednesday, 27 September 2017

WIPW - Catching Up

For Work In Progress Wednesday I can report on my catching up on the Sunday Stitch School's Reference Chart.

I added these stitches:

1 Anundsjö
2 Back
3 Cross
4 Danish Knot
5 Emire
6 Four Sided
7 Gate
8 Heavy Chain
9 Interlaced Running
10 Japanese Darning
11 Knotted Satin
12 Lace
13 Mountmellick
14 Norwich
15 Open Chain
16 Punchetto Valsesiano
17 Q
18 Renaissance


16 comments:

  1. This is a good way of keeping a record, you will soon be an expert in all the stitches!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Actually I had to look up the instructions for some of them! Making a reference chart is good for two reasons; you have an organized stitch sampler and you have to either remember the stitches or learn them again. Repetition is always good for learning.

      Delete
  2. That reference chart will be very useful!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, I am constantly referring to my TAST chart so this SSS chart will be equally useful, I think.

      Delete
  3. Love your idea of the reference chart! How did you get the typed labels for each square, please?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Bren.
      Yes, it is very useful. I typed the numbers and names on the computers word-processing program then printed them on fabric (you can buy A4 sheets of fabric backed with paper to run through the printer. I then ironed on fusing, cut out the names and ironed them onto the chart. From experience I know they will not stay put forever, so I also stitched them down with nylon thread.

      Delete
  4. Nicely done. Reference is an important part of any kind of art.
    You don't have to 'reinvent the wheel' and you can build on
    what you've kept a record of.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I SO agree with you. I NEED books and reference material and pictures and names keep things in order in my brain!
      When I am out of inspiration these charts will always give me a spark of an idea.

      Delete
  5. Thank you so very much. Can't wait to get to the store & buy the A4 fabric. I hope to use a 3-ring binder & use fabric sheets cut 8-1/ x 11 inches. Guess the holes will need to have reinforcements too.

    Your blog is always so helpful & instructional.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for your kind words.
      There is so much you can do with this fabric print technique. Print family photos for a memory quilt or add images to a crazy quilt.
      I have used a product called InkJetPrinting by www.jacquardproducts.com
      Yes, reinforcement would be good for a ring binder.
      Good luck.

      Delete
    2. Great idea for both names and examples. I began a TAST one a few years ago but haven't kept it up. LOL it's on the WISP list.
      I like your version.

      Delete
    3. I like the samplers I have made and are making, too, but as a 'work horse' these charts are much better. For one thing, you can look at the back to see how the stitches are worked, how much thread they need and how to best stop and start.

      Delete
  6. You are so organized! Great chart!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you. A reference chart like this saves time when you are looking for a suitable stitch for a project, but you have to have the time to make the chart!

      Delete
  7. Great to have the name next to the stitch.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, but not so great when you after adding all the labels find you have made a typing mistake!!!!

      Delete

Thank you for dropping by and adding a comment.


Says Google: European Union laws require you to give European Union visitors information about cookies used on your blog. In many cases, these laws also require you to obtain consent.

As a courtesy, we have added a notice on your blog to explain Google's use of certain Blogger and Google cookies, including use of Google Analytics and AdSense cookies.