Wednesday, 5 July 2017

Work In Progress Wednesday - Straight Line Walking

Work In Progress Wednesday for July 5th shows how I have let Elna go Straight Line Walking on

Trinity Green

Yes, the walking foot is a great tool for stitch-in-the-ditch quilting. The bulk of the quilt, though, sometimes makes the foot take a step or two up onto the embankment of the ditch. It IS hard to control the mass of fabric there is in a bedside quilt when you quilt on a domestic sewing machine in a crowded workspace.



The Tagliatelle (strips of turquoise fabric) will eventually be trodden all over by the free form quilting foot.
 This is the quilting seen from the back. On the right the quilting is tighter as I have quilted both sides of the Tagliatelle, I have to do the remaining lines on the left later in the week.

23 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Thank you, I am rather pleased with the result.

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  2. Wow! Amazing progress, that too maneuvering such a big quilt. great work! totally impressed.

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    1. I am pleased with the amount I have been able to stitch, but the maneuvering is putting strain on my shoulders. Taming the domestic machine is not easy!

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  3. It must be a mile long. I don't know how you have managed to pass it under the machine arm and keep straight lines.
    Amazing work Queenie.

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    1. Yes, it is to the Moon and back again. I am using up a lot of thread! Some parts should not be seen or you would KNOW that my work is not amazing!

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  4. your quilting is coming along well no way can I quilt in the ditch think pressing seams open does not help but I do that as if I decided to hand quilt is is easier or I think it is that is my excuse for being unsuccessful!

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    1. By pressing both seams to one side you get a nice ditch and curb, and with a walking foot the straight line quilting is not difficult (as long as you can handle the bulk of the quilt).

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  5. Your quilting in the ditch looks pretty good to me. I know what you mean about the unwieldiness of a quilt on a domestic sewing machine though! I got so frustrated with the process, I gave up any hope of being able to do fmq well, and decided just to hand quilt instead. It takes longer but it's better for my mood.

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    Replies
    1. I got a tip from Carorose about how to use the walking foot for fancy quilting, and I might use that method instead of fmq.

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  6. I can imagine that in a small workspace you spend at least as uch time managing the fabric as actually stitching!

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    1. Exactly! For quilting on a domestic machine you really need space around it for the bulk of the quilt.

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  7. Oh, that looks so perfect! (like everything else you do).

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    1. Well, THAT part is sitting nicely in the ditch, there are some not too nice tire tracks up on the curb!

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  8. Your quilting is beautiful, it's so hard to quilt queen size quilt on a domestic sewing machine.

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  9. I've had trouble stitching in the ditch on occasion where it wanders off the track a little, the quilt sometimes has a life of its own.

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    Replies
    1. The bigger the quilt the more willpower it seems!

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  10. Great progress, Queenie!
    The colors are beautiful, excellent work.

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    1. Thank you. I hope to quiet the turquoise a bit with green quilting thread.

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  11. Oh, oh. Looks like you have one of those imps in your machine. You had better get the house elf on to it.

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    Replies
    1. What house elf? I guess I will have to tackle the imp by myself!

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    2. Queenie, when people view your finished quilt, not a soul would even see a wonky ditch or curb, let alone remark on one. We would only see the beauty of the quilt and remember the enormous effort of work done.

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