Wednesday, 19 October 2016

WIPW - A Good Number

For the Work In Progress Wednesday I can report that for

Trinity Green

I have stitched a good number of triangles, namely 486, which means the total now is 5.724. I can no longer close the lid of the box I am storing the paper strips in.

However there is still more work to do, so keep stitching, Queenie!


Fabric in Focus

Do you ever buy fabric just because you liked the look of it, in spite of not having any plans for how to use it?
Well, I do, or did anyway, now I am trying to use up what I have instead of indulging in impulsive shopping.

One such fat quarter was this rich pattern:


Eventually I found good use for it when I made this fabric box. The left over was cut into triangles and has ended up in Trinity Green.


 

25 comments:

  1. so mnay triangles! Loving the box and yes of course I buy material beacause I love it! dare I admit I must have at lesy 250 metres hidden away must stop buying. When I started I bought a lot of cotton poplin now I know it is not really quilt fabric so maybe will try and make some tote bags and they can be sold at fayres for the hospice.

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    1. Isn't it fascinating how some pieces of fabric have voices and just wisper to you in the shop? 'Come on, touch me, see how soft I am, look at my beautiful pattern and the wonderful colours Take me with you home, p l e a s e!!!'

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  2. The fabric box is wonderful. Also the fabric fits into the triangle perfectly.

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    1. Yes, I think the fabric is rich in itself and add a lot of value to the collection of triangles. I didn't have enough to make another 'big' project and it was just perfect to add the scrap to Trinity Green.

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  3. I'm always buying fabric I have no immediate use for. Sometimes just having it though provides inspiration for a new project, such as a beautifully made fabric box—for storing more impulse buys!

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    1. Well, of course you are right. We might not have plans for the purchase right away but it stays in our stash and memory and then one day we know just what to use it for.

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  4. I go in and out of that. Sometimes I impulse buy and then give it away as a gift when I'm tired of it.

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    1. That is a win-win situation! The shop can sell a piece of fabric, you can enjoy having it in your stash for some time, then your friend will be delighted to get it for free, (or you might swop it for something you are in need of) and free some space in your storage.
      Long live impulse shopping!?

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  5. You found a great use for the fabric, your box is lovely.

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    1. I got a good, easy to follow pattern for the box, and enjoyed making it. I have stored a variety of things in it over the years.

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  6. Well, sometimes the fabric calls out as you pass, "Take me home!" But even if you have no plan, that same fabric often tells you where it wants to be used. It is the storage that is the first issue and the time that is the second.

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    1. Talking fabric! Yes it will often tell you how it wants to be used - if you can hear its call from your overfilled storage, that is! Tonight I will go and listen to some more green fabric in my stash to hear how it wants to be cut (hopefully into triangles!) and where it wants to be placed (hopefully next to other green triangles!).

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    2. It appears you need a larger box for the Trinity Green. Even from here I can hear the Siren Song luring a person to 'buy and take me home'. The pattern is like Crewel work and makes a beautiful covering for the box.

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    3. Yes, I will have to look for a larger box.
      I bought the fabric long before I knew I would fall in love with Crewel work - is that instinct?

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  7. Yes, I do, I can't withstand those lovely patterns. They are so much nicer than what I have got in my stashes in G (basis camp). Maybe I have to wait a hundred years that they become modern again. I wonder when you will start to assemble the Trinity triangles - with or without the paper? Probably with.....because of tortion.

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    1. Ha, ha,'they are so much nicer that what I have (already) got'! I am sure, though, that when you return to G (base camp) you will see that you DO have a lot of equally nice fabric there!
      I need about 7000 triangles before I can start stitching them together, and I will keep the paper in until I no longer need the support of the stiff paper.

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  8. Along with everyone else I love the box. As for fabric, I despair of my addiction. I still have fabric from back in the days when I was a Department store Buyer. It is so beautiful but so useless. I like to sit and stroke it. I tried giving it away. I gave away so much, but, there were empty draws, so I went out and bought more. My latest ploy is to make placemats but that isn't going to get rid of it completely and there are some pieces I just can't cut into. And do you notice the fabric you have isn't quite right for the new project? I just have to buy some more.

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    1. It is nice to have various ways of using fabric - dressmaking, soft furnishing, quilting, rug making, rag weaving...
      I have lots of fabric that has been given to me, from other (much older) people's stash, so the design might be very old fashioned. I also have a number of moth eaten or stained kimono that can no longer be used as clothing.
      Indeed, I often find that what I have is not right for what I want to make - and so I go out and buy something different!
      I think your idea of making placemats and giving them to Meals-On-Wheels is a wonderful way of usisng up stash, and practising quilting.
      Now that you are fighting your cold make sure the sewing machine gets a rest, too. Do some Kogin and sleep!

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  9. Fantastic progress on trinity green. I love your fabric in focus. the box is very beautiful. good work. I too have more fabrics, pieces. I use them in tunics ,but some just lie there to produce guilt feelings, I suppose.

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    1. You make mainly tunics and need larger pieces. Remnants from dressmaking can pile up; my Mum had plenty. These are of course excellent for patchwork or appliqué. The problem is when we have TOO MUCH, and STILL go out and buy more. Feelings of guilt!

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    2. You will not want to see another triangle again when the quilt is finished! I love your box it is so pretty, the material is gorgeous pattern.

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    3. Who knows, I might want to make a triangular cushion to go with the quilt!

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  10. What a pretty fabric box! Beautiful. Way to go with the triangles!

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  11. I tried to comment twice from my phone last week, but must have missed ticking some vital box for them to find you. It's still a steep learning curve for me. This time I'm using my trusty PC to let you know how much I enjoy seeing your fascinating strips of triangles.
    I love both the fabric you couldn't resist and your pretty box. I wouldn't have said the fabric was green but it fits in perfectly with your other triangles. It has been most interesting to see how such a variety of prints look quite at home in you green quilt.
    Keep stitching, Queenie!

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    1. Thank you for your kind words. I am glad I have the box as the piece of fabric there is large enough to enjoy several details. The triangles are so small you don't see the 'whole picture'.
      Anything IT is a steep learning curve! I don't think I would be able to comment from my phone. Maybe I will have to give it a try!

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