Tuesday, 10 February 2015

Testing Clover's Embroidery Threader

Do you remember one of my purchases at Tokyo International Great Quilt Festival was an embroidery threader?

On the left is a traditional threader, easy to find anywhere (I would think), and on the right, with a green plastic handle, Clover's embroidery threader.

They are used in the same way; inserted into the eye of the needle, loaded with thread and pulled out. The difference is that Clover's version is suitable for long-eyed needles (crewel, chenille, tapestry, darners, larger beading).

Now a similar threader can of course be made with a piece of paper:
This method is often found in embroidery books (Mary Thomas's Dictionary of Embroidery Stitches, The Essential Guide To Embroidery...)

★The advantage of the paper method is that the paper is thin and a single strand of thread does not create any bulk.
★The advantage of Clover's threader is that it is sturdy and long lasting. 

I have found my new threader very useful for threading those short strands of thread, orts, I am trying to use on my Pile 'em On project.





18 comments:

  1. So far I have not needed a threader but I took the little machine one to my meeting for others to use. (that is the one where you put the needle in the hole eye-first and lay the thread across the slot before pushing the lever. I like your paper idea because it does not double the thread and that might be more helpful when the thread is a bit thicker.

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    1. It really depends on the thread. In embroidery many kinds of thread are fluffy and can be a nightmare to get through the eye of the needle.
      Thank you for reminding me about that little machine, I have one that is sound asleep at the back of the drawer. I'll get it out and blog about it. I don't know how common they are abroad.
      The paper method is good, but the paper doesn't last long.

      Delete
  2. Looks like a useful little gadget!

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    1. It has a handle that gives you a good grip, and the quality is excellent. It won't break easily.

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  3. Thanks for sharing this new gadget. It looks very sturdy. I use one similar to the metallic one on the left side. It's very helpfull to thread a needle if there's a very short end to secure the thread. That's when the paper method doesn't work!

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    1. Yes, it is actually a bit too sturdy, and can be use only with larger needles. The paper method is great if, like you say, the thread it long enough.

      Delete
  4. It looks a lot sturdier than the traditional threader which I find breaks easily, so hopefully it will last longer. I'm not too bad with threading larger needles, it's the little ones I have problems with.

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    1. This threader can of course be used only with needles that have a long eye. I find that it flattens the thread and it is quite easy to pull through. However, the threader itself is slightly too sturdy i.e. thick, so with finer needles it is useless.
      I'll make another post and discuss threading round-eyed needles and smaller ones.

      Delete
  5. Gadgets are fun, and when they actually work, wow. My big issue with threading is when I need to thread a beading needle, tricky because the eye is so small.
    Thanks for sharing your tips and projects, really helpful.

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    1. I'll make a new 'treading the needle' post with some more information and tips that might be of help with those beading needles.

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  6. I love the paper trick and will try it. I use sometimes the traditional one -

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    1. The paper is a simple and smart way to thread those long-eyed needles, but paper is weak and you'll need a supply.

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  7. I have gone through many of the threaders on the left. The wire would pull out or bend. I like the more substantial Clover threader. It would be a boon for pulling through the -pile 'em ons.
    Thanks for sharing.

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    1. The threader on the left is 'made for breaking' in my opinion, a disposable threader!

      Delete
  8. thanks for sharing this tool. I'll try the paper method.

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  9. How interesting to see threader varieties.
    The stem engine apparently turns the needle so the eye lines up to take the thread. Somebody was busy thinking out this one.
    More often I do what is referred to as 'needling the thread' i.e to enclose the neatened thread end between finger and thumb and move the eye To and On it.

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    Replies
    1. Actually I needle the thread, too, and for a long time thought it was the right way to do it!!! It is so much easier! Maybe I should write a post about that and another neat needle I just thought about.
      The steam engine is of poor quality but Clover, among others, make high quality ones and they really work. So the day when my eyes no longer function well I will invest in a good one.

      Delete

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