Wednesday, 5 February 2014

WIPW - Almost half done

My Work In Progress Wednesday Report this week is as usual on two ongoing projects, the quilt called Kafferepet,  and an embroidered  cushion.

WIPW is a way to make progress on your unfinished fibre related projects and sharing the work with others. Head over to Pintangle for more information.

Kafferepet
No interesting work here, just a few ordinary, but uneven quilting stitches on the blocks with blue fabric and lace. For a full picture of the quilt top before quilting started, click here.

Swedish Cushion
I filled the circle I created last week with TAST #68 Slipped Detached Chain Stitch.
In last week's comments I got some requests for a full view of the progress so far. I have completed almost half the piece of fabric. The cushion will be rectangular with this embroidery on one side and the yet to stitch design on the other side.
We have just got some new lovely TAST stitches that I look forward to adding.

21 comments:

margaret said...

just been back to have a look at the quilt again, so glad I did as I had forgotten about all the lovely work on it, especially the applique borders.Have now lifted the photo onto my computer.It is coming along beautifully, are you putting it into the festival of quilts?
Your cushion is really beautiful

sharonb said...

I am pleased you shared the photo of the progress so far as its looking great

Shami Immanuel said...

Cushion is beautiful. The design is somewhat different.I like it. You have incorporated the stitches very well.

Queeniepatch said...

Actually I started this work while in the UK, about the time when we met at FOQ, in the middle of August last year. I wonder when it will be completed!

Queeniepatch said...

Thank you Sharon, So far I have used about 40 of the 99 TAST stitches we have learned. As it is a cushion I will not add any beaded versions, so ALL TAST stitches will not make their way into it, but I hope to add most of the other.

Miriam said...

Your cushion looks wonderful!

Elizabeth's quarters said...

Just read that you've used 40 stitches on the cushion–that's about 36 more than I know. You've created a really beautiful design, wonderfully dreamlike and detailed, a bit like an Alan Aldridge painting.

Annet said...

I love your dancing slipped detached chain stitches! Thanks for sharing the big picture of your progress so far. Just love the curly bits at the left side!

Elizabeth Braun said...

I agree!

carorose said...

That cushion is going to be even more beautiful than I thought. It is just stunning.

Angela said...

Gorgeous work!

Queeniepatch said...

Thanks, Angela!

Queeniepatch said...

I'm glad you like it. It might be that the second half (not yet done) will become quite different as I have not worked up any design plan yet.

Queeniepatch said...

I thought the Slipped Detached Chain Stitches were successful. At one time I was thinking of making them into the insects you inspired me to stitch when we learned this as a TAST stitch, but thought bugs on a cushion would look creepy!

Queeniepatch said...

Why don't you have a look at TAST FAQ page on Pintangle and select a few stitches to learn?
I am glad you like the design, it is SUPPOSED to be more Swedish in style than an AA painting. Now for the second half...

Queeniepatch said...

Thank you, Miriam. I hope the second half will be as fun to make.

Queeniepatch said...

Thank you, Shami, for your kind words. I am using my imagination of Swedish traditional folk design...

The Pied Pedlar said...

Love the cushion cover , what do you use to mark the pattern .

Susan Hook said...

I love how your cushion is looking, seeing it all in one shows just how beautiful it is going to be!

Queeniepatch said...

I use a Karisma charcoal pen (white) and my friend Julie showed me at the quilt show how to use up all the small bits that I used to throw away. Just load several of them until they reach the lenght of a new 'stick' and they will easily be pushed forward.

Queeniepatch said...

Thank you, Susan. I am now toying with the idea of using some of the designs I saw on the antique Swedish wool embroidery at the quilt show in Tokyo.