Friday, 27 September 2013

A knitted sweater

It has been a long time since I made a 'project' with a TAST stitch - I used to both add a few rows of stitches to the sampler, and then make a picture or something.

When I was working the sampler for Raised Chain Stitches versions 1 and 2, I thought they would make a nice knitted look, as they resembled the Knit and Purl knitting stitches. A project started forming in my head.

In summer, a good friend gave me this book:
In spite of the title, the book is mainly about stumpwork portraits, and has a different approach to that of this excellent book, that I have enjoyed using for so many years:

Here was a great opportunity to try out the new book, and 'knit' a sweater with the two Raised Chain Stitches.

First I made the face. I chose to make a male face, a first for me. This involved paler, beige lips, bushier eyebrows and adding ears. Maybe the biggest difference was how the eyes are worked. Instead of the version by Fay Maxwell, where Detached Chain Stitch and French knots are used, Jan Messent's method is worked in Stem and Satin stitches:

Next came the 'knitting'. I first made a paper pattern for the three parts:
I selected a mustardy shade of Anchor #8 Pearl:
and a piece of scrap fabric I had no other use for. I drew the body and the two sleeves with iron marker (charcoal pen):

The foundation stitches were worked in narrow rows:


If you want to learn the two different stitches please go to Pintangle and the instructions for Raised Chain Stitch Version 1 and Version 2.

The finished result is here. Version 1 in blue and Version 2 in mustard:

Dressing the man involved cutting out the parts and appliquéing them to the background fabric.
I also made a book for him to hold. As I have never written, let alone published, a book, I thought this was my chance, hence the title 'Stitches for Life' by Queenie Patch.
The hands were the trickiest part, and after failing making them according to Jan Messent's method, I had to do them 'my way'.

The most enjoyable part was the knitting. I know it's not very neat, but doesn't it look like a well used, comfy, hand knitted sweater?



36 comments:

  1. So creative, Carin! It came out great!

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    1. Thank you Debbie!
      Nice to hear from you, how have you been?

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  2. Replies
    1. Thanks, well for a first time with a new technique, I am quite pleased.

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  3. Yes the sweater does look very comfy - all over, all over......it looks fantastic, not only the knitted part, the complete gentleman with the book written by Queenie. I am gonna search it at amazon....haha

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    1. I was pleasantly surprised at the result of the stumpwork face. The sweater was fun to make, but as you can see the fibres of the thread has made the sweater 'fluffy' (I used a LONG thread so I didn't have to change often)...
      You won't find the book at Amazon - it's a special issue, only one first edition, and it is priceless!!!

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  4. such beautiful work , I admire your patience to do such delicate work.

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    1. Thank you. I listed to an audio book (Very Good, Jeeves, by P.G. Wodehouse and read by Martin Jarvis) so not one single moment was dull.

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    2. I love the Jeeves books! I've recently listed to Right Ho, Jeeves and My Man Jeeves.

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    3. They ARE funny and although Martin Jarvis is the right man to read them, I still prefer the dramatised versions with Michael Hordern (Jeeves) and Richard Briers (Bertie Wooster).

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  5. I love your stump work man, the 'knitting' is so convincing, and really does look like a much loved jumper! There's an embroiderer called Paddy Killer (yes, that's her real name) who does wonderful portraits–some historical, some modern, if you don't already know of her, I think you might like her work–just google paddy killer embroidery.

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    1. Thank you for your kind words.
      I had to check Paddy Killer, of whom I knew nothing, and was mighty impressed! Thank you for the tip.

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  6. That is truly amazing Queenie........a really clever technique !
    hugs
    Chris Richards
    xxxxx

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    1. Thank you Chris.
      I hope you are well and full of creativity!
      All the best,
      Queenie

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  7. Amazing !!! You are always good in making dress designs!!! I still remember the sweater and gown you made on TAST. The stump work is also so beautiful! Man with your book is really handsome...Love your works Queenie!

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    1. Oh, Latha. Your MEMORY is amazing! Making and dressing these stumpwork people is a bit like playing with paper dolls. Playtime for adults!

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  8. Your stumpwork faces are amazing! The detail, even the hair colors, makes the face look like it will start talking, it's so real. The sweater turned out perfect!

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    1. Wow, THAT would be something, Pamela. Attaching a speaker to the back of the head is the next step, eh?! Before that I need to buy thinner, more flesh coloured thread for the folds of the eyelids; here he looks like he's been smearing on a thick layer of Mum's green eye shadow, no? Or has he read too much of Queenie Patch's 'Stitch for Life' and not understood one word? He'd better read a P.G. Wodehouse!

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  9. You're so wonderfully creative Queenie! Your stumpwork man looks super and the Raised Chain Stitched sweater is superbly done!!

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    1. Thank you, Jenny.
      The book has given me a lot of inspiration for further 'man-making' and I am sure to use the stitch for other knitted items.

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  10. WOW! The word "soulful" came immediately to mind when I saw this gentlemanly face. I agree with Pamela - he looks like he might start a conversation! And his sweater is amazing. Maybe writing a book IS in your future... ?

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    1. Hi, Cynthia, nice to hear from you. Hope you are well!
      I certainly hope these stumpwork folk won't start talking of their own accord! How spooky would that be!!??
      As for writing a book, I am sure in the near future (or even in the present) it will be/is very easy to write and publish your own books without the aid of a publisher. I guess there will be a surge in privately made e-books.

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  11. Has the young man got a name he looks so dapper in his jumper.

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    1. He does not have a name yet; I am open for suggestions, Pippa. Any ideas?

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  12. This guy looks so handsome! Love your special edition book:)
    A great idea to use the raised chain stitch for the sweater,the fold looks so real,well done !

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    1. I loved using these two stitches and as the stitches aren't going through the fabric the sweater can look a bit bulky or well worn. With more patience and a thinner thread you'd get the perfect thin jumper, a twin set or similar. Then you'd need a necklace instead of the book!

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  13. Wow, what a handsome guy! Thanks for sharing the process too. Just love the 'knitted' sweater. It's a pity my stumpwork figure already has some clothes, or I had used this easier method. One of my stumpwork faces turned out to be male too, I'll share my work in a few weeks.

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    1. Considering this was the first time I made a male face and used the Stem and Satin stitches for the eyes, I am very pleased with the result.
      There are so many ways to make clothes for the portraits, proper tailored things, knitted stitches or just a short piece of lace or ribbon for the collar...
      I am very much looking forward to seeing your piece.
      Happy stitching, Annet!

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  14. I have just spotted this post, your little man is amazing. The way you have created the jumper is so clever!

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    1. Thank you, Susan. Well, I got a lot of inspiration from you and your yarn magic!

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  15. I think the boy and especially the sweater are wonderful. You are very talented. Thank you for showing the process in such detail - great photos. What are you planning to do with the finished project?

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    1. Thank you for your kind comment. I wanted to record the process as it was the first time I tried out the instructions in that new book.
      I finish most of my 'projects' by mounting them over cardboard. I show how here:
      http://queeniepatch.blogspot.jp/2012/11/mounting-tast.html

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  16. You have created a very realistic male face, Queenie. I really like those dreamy eyes, which look real also..I wondered if they were glass for a second.

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    1. Hi there!
      Thank you for your kind comment. This method was totally new to me, and with the right shade of thread I think you could make eyes that are almost too realistic! I'll try again with better choice of skin colours.
      Your doll in the picture is nice! A realistic one!

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  17. You've done a great job! Love the jumper and I think his eyes are lovely.

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    1. Thanks!
      Yes, this new method is a way to make the eyes come to life!

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