Monday, 5 August 2013

Keep the kitchen clean, or rather the bread rolls warm!

I went shopping for textile, yet again.
This time was on an island in the Stockholm archipelago where I found a shop full of beautiful island craft.

Möja, and the other islands, are charming and idyllic in summer, but the people who live here all year round might have a lot of time on their hands in the cold winter months, so craft is a way to earn a living and while away the long, dark, cold days.

So what did I buy?
I bought a dishcloth!
In recent years we have seen a variety of dishcloths. The most common cloth is the spongy type seen in the front of the picture. This type used to be available only in plain colours, but now they have become very arty - and expensive. The one here is cheap-ish, very absorbent and fully functional.

A couple of years ago I bought the green knitted one, handmade by the charming Irma on the island of Gotland. This cloth is soft and lovely to touch. I envy the kitchen surfaces!

That leaves us with the last one, in the upper left corner of the photograph, that I have now added to my collection of kitchen tidies.
It is woven by the talented Ulla Närding, who had many other items, woven rag mats and knitted shawls for instance, in the shop.

Although perfect for keeping the drain board free from water with its mix of cotton and linen fibres,  I actually intend to use this cloth as a small 'doily' or in my bread basket. Don't you agree that it is just too beautiful to use in any other way?

With what, and how, do you keep your kitchen surfaces clean? I am sure this could be a most interesting subject!


12 comments:

  1. Vad avundsjuk jag blir. Stockholms skärgård är ju bara så fin. Vad gäller trasorna så är det ju lite kul och rolig att använda så fina. Sedan några år tillbaka har jag stickat i lin och faktiskt är det det enda som går att sälja på julmarknaden. Roligt att ta del av dina inköp.
    Ingalill

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Å, vad roligt att du lyckats skriva en kommentar!
      Ja, Stockholms skärgård är fin, men alla platser i Sverige har något fint att visa upp.
      Jag kan väl tänka mig att dina stickade lin trasor går åt på julmarknaden. Lin har ju en sådan fantastisk uppsugningsförmåga.

      Delete
  2. I would keep the bread rolls warm, the cloths are much to nice to get dirty!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Your kitchen linens are charming. For cleaning, I use some ordinary cloths and sponges, but I do have some cross stitched kitchen towels that I use to dry the dishes.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In Japan I use sponges or 'oshibori' terry towels for cleaning the surfaces and nice linen teatowels or 'tenugi' for drying the dishes.
      I bet you did the cross stich on those kitchen towels!

      Delete
  4. I always used those boring yellow discloths, but recently I found some white ones with kitschy pink flowers. Much more fun in the kitchen!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is really nice to have lovely things to brighten up daily housework on an ordinary day.

      Delete
  5. I received one of these printed sponge type dish clothes from a friend last Xmas. She bought it in Finland. Problem is that it is so nice I haven't used it because I wouldn't be able to buy another one. My one is marked bio-degradable.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The printed ones have become the rage here in Scandinavia. However I think they are too expensive, and won't last very long.

      Delete
  6. this first thing I ever knittted was a dish cloth, a very old lady taught my sister and me how to knit, mind you I am going back about 60 years! Do not knit them now, just use a plain one bought from the ironmongers 3 for !31.25

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is an items one either wants to toss away when it's past its prime, or to be able to soak in boiling water. I have never knitted one myself and can not recall that my mother did either.

      Delete

Thank you for dropping by and adding a comment.


Says Google: European Union laws require you to give European Union visitors information about cookies used on your blog. In many cases, these laws also require you to obtain consent.

As a courtesy, we have added a notice on your blog to explain Google's use of certain Blogger and Google cookies, including use of Google Analytics and AdSense cookies.