Friday, 5 October 2012

TAST2012 Week 40

For Week 40 of TAST2012 the stitch is Beaded Hedebo Edge.

Ever since I was a small girl I have loved embroidery. However, in spite of having tried various techniques and collected a number of books, I must admit that I am ignorant and still have SO much to learn about this subject.

This became apparent on Tuesday when Sharon announced the weekly stitch. 'Hedebo', I thought, 'How lovely to do a Swedish stitch!' Shame on me, and I do apologise to all Danish people, for thinking it is Swedish embroidery. I had confused it with some of the other types of embroidery distinct for a district, like: Järvsjösöm, Delsbosöm, Hallandssöm or Anundsjösöm. The latter is demonstrated by Karin Holmberg here.

So, Hedebo embroidery is Danish, and I would say, a mix of cutwork and needlelace. The edge with beads is particularly pretty and I had a great time making this flower:


I liked the cross stitches for the base so much I decided to keep them as they were for the 'leaves'.


It is sometimes difficult to add small beads as the needle is too thick. This is how I solved the problem: I first made the cross stitches with a thicker, sharp needle, creating larger holes (important in my tightly woven fabric). For the Hedebo loops and beads I changed to a thinner, blunt needle.  The thread would then pass through the beads, not snag the base stitches as well as pass through the fabric in the holes. 



23 comments:

  1. until I saw your flower i had no idea how well this stitch suits for outlining the flowers..brilliant!!..

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    1. I have just seen it used to outline a shisha mirrror. It is a very flexible stitch.

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  2. your flower works beautifully with this stitch, I have struggled with it so not put anything on my blog yet.Like you i had a problem with the thickness of the needle, managed to thread the thread directly through the eye in the end.

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    1. I thought of threading the beads without the needle but thought it would be too fiddly and time consuming; just like that Drizzle stitch! Lazy me!

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  3. Lovely stitches so neat as always.

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  4. your flower looks wonderful.It's a pleasure to discover how usability can have this stitch

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  5. Ha ha, atleast you knew it was a Scandinavian stitch, I would have been completely lost! You used the stitch beautifully, so suited to that delicate flower. Have a lovely weekend.

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  6. Gorgeous design! If the needle is too big for the beads, I'll add them later with a thinner thread.

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    1. That's because you are SMART and solve the problem in CLEVER way! I have read that many participants face the same problem and have either struggled with re-threading or threading without a needle (must be hard!) or like me changed the needle. Nancilyn, http://www.flickr.com/photos/playswithfibers/, used small buttons, which I think is another SMART idea, as well as attractive. You used French Knots in your previous TAST challenge, and Diane of http://www.flickr.com/photos/frogworkz/8052291313/in/pool-56846286@N00/ did the same thing.
      It is SO inspiring to see what others do. Many thanks!

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  7. This is a lovely piece. Your stitching is so neat! I like the cross-stitched leaves too.

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  8. I like your applique idea, neat.

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  9. I love your flower and thank you for sharing the process!

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  10. What a sweet flower. Lovely stitching as usual. Congratulations on the Highlight.

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  11. Love this way your flowers turned out! I'm still trying to catch up with the rest. Getting ready to do the knotted buttonhole and am even having problems with it! Left handed of course!

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    1. Sorry I have no idea what problems you left handed needleworkers face. I believe Sharon of Pintangle is left handed, too.

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  12. ah! just beautiful! the edging around the flower is lovely - thank you for commenting on my blog - it is actually vintage silk lining from a haori that I embroidered on (like charmeuse), so it is much softer :)
    there is an array information to learn from your blog - thank you for sharing your findings and experience with us all! very much appreciated :D

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    1. Oh, haori lining. That's is usually soft and wonderful to work with. It feels so nice when fabric can be recycled and used to create something new and beautiful. Looking forward to seeing more of your work on your blog.
      Now for that Knotted Loop Stitch...

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  13. Beautifully stitched and so neat that you used it as an edge around your fabric. Looks absolutely lovely!

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  14. This is beautifully and neatly done. I really admire your patience


    Ms Sharma
    http://summersofindia.blogspot.in

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  15. Thank you all for your kind comments.

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